• Finding Bass When the Ice Melts

    Ice Out Bass Fishing

    Ice out is something that is highly anticipated by the northern anglers.   Many lakes, reservoirs and ponds can freeze solid for several months, keeping you away from catching bass, unless you’re an ice fishermen.  As the end of winter approaches, all we keep saying is “when will the ice finally start to melt?” When the winter continues to linger on the excitement for the ice out builds.   For those of you who didn’t spend your free time during the winter organizing your tackle boxes, cleaning your reels and all

  • Line Watching On The Ice

    Line watching has been a great way of detecting strikes in many types of fishing.  It can be tricky at times, and especially when ice fishing with different light conditions.

    Straight-line fishing has a couple of detection times.  The early one is when the line is seen to do something different, such as stop as it is going down, moving to the side, or a slight twitch downward and/or upward. 
  • Prespawn Cold Front Bass [VIDEO]

    In the early spring on natural lakes and ponds, cold fronts can push largemouth bass into very predictable places.  In this video we share tips for catching post frontal bass under blue bird skies with a Keitech Model 1 Jig.  When water temps are still in the 40-50 degrees range, and you have clumps of grass and matted vegitation can be the ticket in shallower coves, pockets and ponds.

  • Tips on Exploring New Waters [VIDEO]

    Exploring a new body of water and figuring out what the bass are keying in on forces you to become a more versatile angler. We all have our favorite fishing holes, but it's important to challenge yourself and step out of our comfort zone by getting out on unfamiliar waters.

    Here’s three tips on approaching new water:

    1) Do a little research and try to find out the conditions leading up to your arrival. Air temps, wind speed and directions, water temps, best tactics, etc. Having some local info before you head out is extremely useful.

    2) Pay attention to subtle details and changes in the weather and conditions. This will help you adapt when things change. Use the local info you gathered only as a starting point to work from.

    3) Fish your strengths first. If you can catch bass doing something you have confidence in, you’ll enjoy the day much more. Save the new techniques for trial on waters that you already know well.