Jackson County is a prime location for late-season fishing
Fort, Davis and Graveline bayous have bites

Sun Herald
By AL JONES
afjones@sunherald.com

OCEAN SPRINGS --Despite heavy rainfall over the past week, fishing continues to be solid in South Mississippi.

From speckled trout to around Fort Bayou to bass in the Pearl River, fish are being caught.

Kenny Dinero of Ocean Springs Marine Mart in the Ocean Springs Harbor, said trout are being caught in Fort Bayou, Davis Bayou and Graveline Bayou, all located in Jackson County.

"It's been pretty good," Dinero said. "They are catching some nice trout, some between two and four pounds, slow-trolling live bull minnows and D.O.A (artificial)."

Plastic jigs and slow-sinking lures also work when slow-trolling for speckled trout during the winter months.

As solid as fishing has been, the availability of live shrimp is becoming scarce. According to Dinero, live shrimp are still being caught despite the heavy rains and the off and on again passing cold fronts.

"We are still catching shrimp," he said. "But this might be the last of them."

Barrier island fishing for speckled trout has been slow but redfish are being caught around Cat Island in the South Bayou and Smuggles Cove using slow-sinking lures and gold spoons.

As far as the offshore scene, amberjack and cobia are still lingering around the deeper water oil rigs.

The annual yellowfin run at the Midnight Lumps on the west side of the Mississippi River is starting to heat up. There were a few reports this past week of tuna in the 80- to 100-pound range being caught using chunks of dead bait.

Other spots for trout include Biloxi's Big Lake, Mary Walker Bayou in Gautier, the Jourdan River near Diamondhead as well as Deer Island under the lights of the casinos.

Bass fishing has also been steady in Sioux Bayou in Gautier, the upper parts of the Biloxi and Tchoutacabouffa rivers.

Over at the Pearl River, 2- to 4-pound bass have been reported using floating worms and crank baits. The fish are holding close to structure and drop offs during the morning hours and move along the open banks in the afternoon when the temperature warms up.

FISHING

REPORT